Literacy

It is not enough to simply teach children to read; we have to give them something worth reading. Something that will stretch their imaginations--something that will help them make sense of their own lives and encourage them to reach out toward people whose lives are quite different from their own. 

- Katherine Patterson  

LITERACY COUNTS FROM DAY ONE!

The ability to read and write is tied to everything we do.  Research shows that children who have developed strong reading skills perform better in school and have a healthier self-image. Johnson Elementary School supports the idea that developing literacy skills is a primary focus for learning.  In addition to the teaching provided by classroom teachers, there are specialists who also work with students who may be experiencing difficulty in the acquisition of reading and writing skills.  For the current 2016-2017 school year, Mrs. Jill Dennis and Ms. Donna Dupray will be providing supplementary literacy services to students.






       Tips For Fostering a Lifelong Love of Reading

Reading aloud to children at an early age is the most effective way to help them expand their vocabulary and recognize written words. Reading also stimulates a child's imagination and expands his or her understanding of the world.

There are many ways to include reading in all stages of childhood. When children focus on literacy activities they enjoy, reading will be seen as a treat, not a chore. Follow these tips at home:


  • Limit television and computer time in favor of reading time.
  • Lead by example. Children will value reading when they see their role models reading.
  • Read to  children. This teaches them that reading is important and it can open the lines of communication on many topics.
  • Join your local library. Find library books about current interests in the child's life and then read them together.






                                                

                                              





      
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